(Source: real-hiphophead)

(Reblogged from simplybasketball)
tank-commander:

Six ways climate change is screwing with your seafood (and what to do about it)

1. Climate change is bad for fish. As a result of these stresses, in most parts of the world, fish catches will decrease by 40 to 60 percent. 
2. Like $17 to $41 billion bad. That’s how much climate change is going to cost the fishing industry by 2050, according to the IPCC. 
3. We’re adding insult to injury. Healthy ecosystems might be able to resist some of the upcoming climate changes, but they don’t stand much of a chance when they are already severely stressed by pollution, runoff, microplastic, oil spills, bottom trawling, seabed mining, overfishing, invasive species.
4. Coral reefs are headed for the exit. When reefs go, a number of important coastal fisheries will be gone, too.
5. Fish can migrate, but international accord is slower to catch up. When fish migrate, the treaties and agreements and international laws that say who is allowed to harvest how many have a hard time keeping up.
6. Fish farms, a possible alternative to wild fisheries, could be in trouble, too.
There are some things we can do to ease the pain.
Limit non-climate stressors, such as nitrogen pollution (by decreasing agricultural erosion)
Step up the recycling game, and wind down the plastic-everything consumer culture
Reduce overfishing (by changing fishing gear, and updating fishery management protocol to be more flexible and responsive)
Build artificial reefs to serve as fish nurseries when the coral goes
Protect mangroves and salt marshes as important habitat and carbon sequesters

tank-commander:

Six ways climate change is screwing with your seafood (and what to do about it)

1. Climate change is bad for fish. As a result of these stresses, in most parts of the world, fish catches will decrease by 40 to 60 percent. 

2. Like $17 to $41 billion bad. That’s how much climate change is going to cost the fishing industry by 2050, according to the IPCC. 

3. We’re adding insult to injury. Healthy ecosystems might be able to resist some of the upcoming climate changes, but they don’t stand much of a chance when they are already severely stressed by pollution, runoff, microplastic, oil spills, bottom trawling, seabed mining, overfishing, invasive species.

4. Coral reefs are headed for the exit. When reefs go, a number of important coastal fisheries will be gone, too.

5. Fish can migrate, but international accord is slower to catch up. When fish migrate, the treaties and agreements and international laws that say who is allowed to harvest how many have a hard time keeping up.

6. Fish farms, a possible alternative to wild fisheries, could be in trouble, too.

There are some things we can do to ease the pain.

  • Limit non-climate stressors, such as nitrogen pollution (by decreasing agricultural erosion)
  • Step up the recycling game, and wind down the plastic-everything consumer culture
  • Reduce overfishing (by changing fishing gear, and updating fishery management protocol to be more flexible and responsive)
  • Build artificial reefs to serve as fish nurseries when the coral goes
  • Protect mangroves and salt marshes as important habitat and carbon sequesters
(Reblogged from tank-commander)

Mr Handsome #1 and Mr Handsome #2 and Earl. @coachroon

Mr Handsome #1 and Mr Handsome #2 and Earl. @sheilamcneill @geoffahowe

Mr Handsome #1 and Mr Handsome #2 and Earl.

Blazer made it up his first mountain!

(Reblogged from h-o-r-n-g-r-y)
tank-commander:

Everything is Connected

There are six key ocean and marine findings in the climate change report;
The rise in ocean temperatures over the last century will persist into the future, with continued large impacts on climate, ocean circulation, chemistry and ecosystems.
The ocean currently absorbs about a quarter of human-caused carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere, leading to ocean acidification that will alter marine ecosystems in dramatic, yet uncertain ways. 
Significant habitat loss will continue to occur due to climate change for many species and areas. 
Rising sea surface temperatures have been linked with increasing levels and ranges of diseases in humans and marine life including corals, abalones, oysters, fishes and marine mammals. 
Climate changes that result in conditions substantially different than recent history may significantly increase costs to business as well as disrupt public access and enjoyment of ocean areas.
In response to observed and projected climate impacts, some existing oceans policies, practices and management efforts are incorporating climate change impacts. These initiatives can serve as models for other efforts and ultimately enable people and communities to adapt to changing ocean conditions. 

Photo Credit: Tim  

tank-commander:

Everything is Connected

There are six key ocean and marine findings in the climate change report;

  1. The rise in ocean temperatures over the last century will persist into the future, with continued large impacts on climate, ocean circulation, chemistry and ecosystems.
  2. The ocean currently absorbs about a quarter of human-caused carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere, leading to ocean acidification that will alter marine ecosystems in dramatic, yet uncertain ways. 
  3. Significant habitat loss will continue to occur due to climate change for many species and areas. 
  4. Rising sea surface temperatures have been linked with increasing levels and ranges of diseases in humans and marine life including corals, abalones, oysters, fishes and marine mammals. 
  5. Climate changes that result in conditions substantially different than recent history may significantly increase costs to business as well as disrupt public access and enjoyment of ocean areas.
  6. In response to observed and projected climate impacts, some existing oceans policies, practices and management efforts are incorporating climate change impacts. These initiatives can serve as models for other efforts and ultimately enable people and communities to adapt to changing ocean conditions. 

Photo Credit: Tim  

(Reblogged from tank-commander)

mathew-foster:

Opal Creek, Oregon

(Reblogged from h-o-r-n-g-r-y)
(Reblogged from fallontonight)
happy birthday, paiger!

I’m back. I promise.

(Source: hearttford)

(Reblogged from roadtrip-to-nowhere)
Played 7,537 times

(Source: putyourredlipson)

(Reblogged from thatkindofwoman)

My little trail blazer.